©Salvador Dali - Gradiva Finds the Anthropomorphic Ruins 1931

Gradiva Finds the Anthropomorphic Ruins 1931
Gradiva Finds the Anthropomorphic Ruins
1931 65x54cm oil/canvas
Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Madrid, Spain

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From Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Madrid:
When Salvador Dalí settled in Paris in 1929, he came into contact with the Surrealist group led by André Breton. That summer he invited to Cadaqués the Surrealists René Magritte, Camille Goemans, Luis Buñuel and Paul Éluard and his wife Gala, with whom Dalí immediately fell in love and who became his muse for the rest of his life. Dalí’s main contribution to Surrealism was his “paranoiac-critical method,” developed from 1930, according to which, on the basis of Freudian theories on dream interpretation, every image could be read doubly: “The way in which it has been possible to obtain a double image is clearly paranoiac,” the artist explains. “By a double image is meant such a representation of an object that is also, without the slightest physical or anatomical change, the representation of another entirely different object, the second representation being equally devoid of any deformity or abnormality betraying arrangement.”

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